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WWI Armistice Centenary

(Librarian Selected)



World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It
by Berg, A. Scott

9781598535143A. Scott Berg (Editor)World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived ItFew Americans appreciate the significance and intensity of America's experience of World War I, the global cataclysm that transformed the modern world. Published to mark the centenary of the American entry into the conflict, World War I- Told by the Americans Who Lived It brings together a wide range of writings by American participants and observers to tell a vivid and dramatic firsthand story from the outbreak of war in 1914 through the Armistice, the Paris Peace Conference, and the League of Nations debate. The eighty-eight men andwomen collected in the volume--soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists--provide unique insights into how Americans of every stripe perceived the war, why they supported or opposed intervention, how they experienced the nightmarish reality of industrial warfare, and how the conflict changed American life. Richard Harding Davis witnesses the burning of Louvain; Edith Wharton tours the front in the Argonne and Flanders; John Reed reports from Serbia and Bukovina; Charles Lauriat describes the sinking of the Lusitania; Leslie Davis records the Armenian genocide; Jane Addams and Emma Goldman protest against militarism; Victor Chapman and Edmond Genet fly with the Lafayette Escadrille; Floyd Gibbons, Hervey Allen, and Edward Lukens experience the ferocity of combat in Belleau Wood, Fismette, and the Meuse-Argonne; and Ellen La Motte and Mary Borden unflinchingly examine the "human wreckage" brought into military hospitals. W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Jessie Fauset, and Claude McKay protest the racist treatment of black soldiers and the violence directed at African Americans on the home front; Carrie Chapman Catt connects the war with the fight for women suffrage; Willa Cather explores the impact of the war on rural Nebraska; Henry May recounts a deadly influenza outbreak onboard a troop transport; Oliver Wendell Holmes weighs the limits of free speech in wartime; Woodrow Wilson envisions a world without war. A coda presents three iconic literary works by Ernest Hemingway, E. E. Cummings, and John Dos Passos. With an introduction and headnotes by A. Scott Berg, brief biographies of the writers, and endpaper papers. - Description from Syndetics
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The First World War
by Strachan, Hew

9780143035183Hew StrachanThe First World War"This serious, compact survey of the war's history stands out as the most well-informed, accessible work available." ( Los Angeles Times ) Nearly a century has passed since the outbreak of World War I, yet as military historian Hew Strachan (winner of the 2016 Pritzker Literature Award) argues in this brilliant and authoritative new book, the legacy of the "war to end all wars" is with us still. The First World War was a truly global conflict from the start, with many of the most decisive battles fought in or directly affecting the Balkans, Africa, and the Ottoman Empire. Even more than World War II, the First World War continues to shape the politics and international relations of our world, especially in hot spots like the Middle East and the Balkans. Strachan has done a masterful job of reexamining the causes, the major campaigns, and the consequences of the First World War, compressing a lifetime of knowledge into a single definitive volume tailored for the general reader. Written in crisp, compelling prose and enlivened with extraordinarily vivid photographs and detailed maps, The First World War re-creates this world-altering conflict both on and off the battlefield--the clash of ideologies between the colonial powers at the center of the war, the social and economic unrest that swept Europe both before and after, the military strategies employed with stunning success and tragic failure in the various theaters of war, the terms of peace and why it didn't last. Drawing on material culled from many countries, Strachan offers a fresh, clear-sighted perspective on how the war not only redrew the map of the world but also set in motion the most dangerous conflicts of today. Deeply learned, powerfully written, and soon to be released with a new introduction that commemorates the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the war, The First World War remains a landmark of contemporary history. - Description from Syndetics
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Terror of the Autumn Skies: The True Story of Frank Luke, America's Rogue Ace of World War I
by Pardoe, Blaine Lee

9781602392526Blaine PardoeTerror of the Autumn Skies: The True Story of Frank Luke, America's Rogue Ace of World War IFrank Luke, Jr. was an unlikely pilot. In the Great War, when fliers were still "knights of the air," Luke was an ungallant loner--a kid from Arizona who collected tarantulas, shot buzzards, and boxed miners. But during two torrid weeks in September 1918, he was the deadliest man on the Western Front. In only ten missions, he destroyed fourteen heavily-defended German balloons and four airplanes, the second highest American tally in the entire war. Author Blaine Pardoe retraces and refreshes Frank Luke's story through recently discovered correspondence. Frantic, short, and splendid, the life of Frank Luke, Jr. dramatizes the tragic intervention of an American spirit in the war that devastated Europe. - Description from Syndetics
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Brushes With War: Paintings and Drawings by the Troops of World War I
by Parkinson, Joel

9780764346347Joel R. ParkinsonBrushes with War: Paintings and Drawings by the Troops of World War IBrushes With War is a unique history of World War I in broad brush strokes. Over 230 original paintings, drawings, sculpture, and trench art by the combatants of World War I cover all aspects of the war and most major battles from Mons (1914) to the Meuse-Argonne (1918). The artists were American, Austrian, Australian, Belgian, British, Canadian, French, German, and Russian soldiers. These were not professional artists, but amateurs depicting their own daily struggles as they saw them. Just as snapshot photos are often more realistic than posed professional portraits, these works of art are more genuine impressions of the war than the official art and illustrations of the time. - Description from Syndetics
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Gas! Gas! Quick, Boys: How Chemistry Changed the First World War
by Freemantle, Michael

9780750953757Michael FreemantleGas! Gas! Quick, Boys: How Chemistry Shaped the First World WarThe harnessing of the power of chemistry was a key factor in determining the shape and duration of the First World War and ultimately became the difference between winning and losing.The industrial-scale carnage and devastation seen on all fronts during the conflict would not have been possible without the chemistry of war, which generated the huge quantities of metals and explosives required for artillery shells and fuses; for pistol, rifle and machine-gun cartridges; for grenades and trench mortar bombs and for the mines blown up in tunnelling operations. It also created deadly chemical warfare agents, such as chlorine gas, mustard gas and phosgene, which filled artillery shells or were released in cloud gas operations. However, chemistry was not only a destructive instrument of war but also protected troops and healed the sick and wounded. This double-edged sword is perfectly exemplified by the element chlorine, which served both as a frontline offensive weapon, causing horrific injuries and death, as well as a disinfectant and water-purifying agent saving many lives.Michael Freemantle, in this first all-encompassing study of the chemistry of the Great War, reveals the true extent of the chemical arms race and how industry evolved to meet the needs for more powerful explosives and deadlier gases, as well as advancements in medicine. From bombs to bullets, tear gas to TNT, camouflage to cordite, this book tells the true story of the horrors of the 'Chemists War'. - Description from Syndetics
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The Hello Girls: America's First Women Soldiers
by Cobbs Hoffman, Elizabeth

9780674971479Elizabeth CobbsThe Hello Girls: America's First Women SoldiersThis is the story of how America's first women soldiers helped win World War I, earned the vote, and fought the U.S. Army. In 1918, the U.S. Army Signal Corps sent 223 women to France. They were masters of the latest technology: the telephone switchboard. General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces, demanded female "wire experts" when he discovered that inexperienced doughboys were unable to keep him connected with troops under fire. Without communications for even an hour, the army would collapse. While suffragettes picketed the White House and President Woodrow Wilson struggled to persuade a segregationist Congress to give women of all races the vote, these competent and courageous young women swore the Army oath. Elizabeth Cobbs reveals the challenges they faced in a war zone where male soldiers welcomed, resented, wooed, mocked, saluted, and ultimately celebrated them. They received a baptism by fire when German troops pounded Paris with heavy artillery. Some followed "Black Jack" Pershing to battlefields where they served through shelling and bombardment. Grace Banker, their 25-year-old leader, won the Distinguished Service Medal. The army discharged the last Hello Girls in 1920, the same year Congress ratified the Nineteenth Amendment granting the ballot. When the operators sailed home, the army unexpectedly dismissed them without veterans' benefits. They began a sixty-year battle that a handful of survivors carried to triumph in 1979. With the help of the National Organization for Women, Senator Barry Goldwater, and a crusading Seattle attorney, they triumphed over the U.S. Army. - Description from Syndetics
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The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
by Clark, Christopher M

9780061146657Christopher ClarkThe Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914One of The New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of the Year Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 is historian Christopher Clark's riveting account of the explosive beginnings of World War I. Drawing on new scholarship, Clark offers a fresh look at World War I, focusing not on the battles and atrocities of the war itself, but on the complex events and relationships that led a group of well-meaning leaders into brutal conflict. Clark traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute, action-packed narrative that cuts between the key decision centers in Vienna, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Paris, London, and Belgrade, and examines the decades of history that informed the events of 1914 and details the mutual misunderstandings and unintended signals that drove the crisis forward in a few short weeks. Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Christopher Clark's The Sleepwalkers is a dramatic and authoritative chronicle of Europe's descent into a war that tore the world apart. - Description from Syndetics
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Loyalty in the Time of Trial: The African American Experience During World War I
by Mjagkij, Nina

9780742570436Nina MjagkijLoyalty in Time of Trial: The African American Experience During World War IIn one of the few book-length treatments of the subject, Nina Mjagkij conveys the full range of the African American experience during the "Great War." Prior to World War I, most African Americans did not challenge the racial status quo. But nearly 370,000 black soldiers served in the military during the war, and some 400,000 black civilians migrated from the rural South to the urban North for defense jobs. Following the war, emboldened by their military service and their support of the war on the home front, African Americans were determined to fight for equality. These two factors forced America to confront the impact of segregation and racism. - Description from Syndetics
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Voices from the Front: An Oral History of the Great War
by Hart, Peter

9780190464936Peter HartVoices from the Front: An Oral History of the Great WarIn the 1980s and early 1990s, Peter Hart, then a young oral historian at the Imperial War Museum in London, conducted 183 interviews with British World War I veterans. After the death of the last veteran in 2009, these interviews have become a rare and invaluable record of the Great War, as remembered by the men who experienced it. The men spoke to Hart of the familiar horrors of the war-poison gas, lice, muddy trenches, newly minted tanks, and sinking ships-enriching each memory with personal anecdote, shedding light on war's effect on soldiers both in wartime and during the years that followed. Hart now returns to these interviews in Voices from the Front. His new book not only provides a narrative timeline of the events of 1914 to 1918, but restores individuality and humanity to the men who were often treated like expendable resources. Hart uses the transcripts of these conversations as a framework on which to build a unique depiction of Britain's experience of the war-one separated from the boastful exaggerations or, alternatively, the underplaying euphemisms often found in letters mailed home or to fellow soldiers. By including the testimonies of men such as William Holbrook, who was just 15 when he enlisted, as well as Harold Bing, an anti-war demonstrator, Hart breathes new life into the experiences of both young soldiers and those who morally opposed the war. The result is history as both narrative and recollection; war experienced first-hand but looked at now from a great distance. Here is an intimate and humanized account of the first great cataclysm of the twentieth century, one endured by the men whose voices we hear in this book, and whose legacies are with us still. - Description from Syndetics
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All Quiet on the Western Front
by Remarque, Erich Maria

9781439570319Erich Maria RemarqueAll Quiet on the Western FrontPaul Baumer enlisted with his classmates in the German army of World War I. Youthful, enthusiastic, they become soldiers. But despite what they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other--if only he can come out of the war alive. "The world has a great writer in Erich Maria Remarque. He is a craftsman of unquestionably first trank, a man who can bend language to his will. Whether he writes of men or of inanimate nature, his touch is sensitive, firm, and sure." THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW - Description from Syndetics
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Modified: October 08, 2018