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Fiction (1965 - date)

( Pulitzer )



Humboldt's Gift
by Bellow, Saul

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3503 .E4488 H8
Publication Date:
1976




March
by Brooks, Geraldine

9780143036661Geraldine BrooksMarchWinner of the Pulitzer Prize--a powerful love story set against the backdrop of the Civil War, from the author of The Secret Chord. From Louisa May Alcott's beloved classic Little Women , Geraldine Brooks has animated the character of the absent father, March, and crafted a story "filled with the ache of love and marriage and with the power of war upon the mind and heart of one unforgettable man" (Sue Monk Kidd). With "pitch-perfect writing" ( USA Today ), Brooks follows March as he leaves behind his family to aid the Union cause in the Civil War. His experiences will utterly change his marriage and challenge his most ardently held beliefs. A lushly written, wholly original tale steeped in the details of another time, March secures Geraldine Brooks's place as a renowned author of historical fiction. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PR9619.3.B7153 M37 2006
Publication Date:
2006







Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, The
by Chabon, Michael

9780679450047Michael ChabonThe Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and ClayWith this brilliant novel, the bestselling author of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh and Wonder Boys gives us an exhilarating triumph of language and invention, a stunning novel in which the tragicomic adventures of a couple of boy geniuses reveal much about what happened to America in the middle of the twentieth century. Like Phillip Roth's American Pastoral or Don DeLillo's Underworld, Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay is a superb novel with epic sweep, spanning continents and eras, a masterwork by one of America's finest writers. It is New York City in 1939. Joe Kavalier, a young artist who has also been trained in the art of Houdini-esque escape, has just pulled off his greatest feat to date: smuggling himself out of Nazi-occupied Prague. He is looking to make big money, fast, so that he can bring his family to freedom. His cousin, Brooklyn's own Sammy Clay, is looking for a collaborator to create the heroes, stories, and art for the latest novelty to hit the American dreamscape: the comic book. Out of their fantasies, fears, and dreams, Joe and Sammy weave the legend of that unforgettable champion the Escapist. And inspired by the beautiful and elusive Rosa Saks, a woman who will be linked to both men by powerful ties of desire, love, and shame, they create the otherworldly mistress of the night, Luna Moth. As the shadow of Hitler falls across Europe and the world, the Golden Age of comic books has begun. The brilliant writing that has led critics to compare Michael Chabon to John Cheever and Vladimir Nabokov is everywhere apparent in The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. Chabon writes "like a magical spider, effortlessly spinning out elaborate webs of words that ensnare the reader," wrote Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times about Wonder Boys--and here he has created, in Joe Kavalier, a hero for the century. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3553 .H15 A82 2000
Publication Date:
2001




Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, The
by Diaz, Junot

9781594483295Junot DíazThe Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Winner of: The Pulitzer Prize The National Book Critics Circle Award The Anisfield-Wolf Book Award The Jon Sargent, Sr. First Novel Prize A Time Magazine #1 Fiction Book of the Year One of the best books of 2007 according to: The New York Times , San Francisco Chronicle, New York Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, People, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, Salon, Baltimore City Paper, The Christian Science Monitor, Booklist, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, New York Public Library, and many more... Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who--from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister--dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fuk#65533;--a curse that has haunted Oscar's family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere--and risk it all--in the name of love. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3554 .I259 B75 2007
Publication Date:
2008




All the light we cannot see : a novel
by Doerr, Anthony

9781476746586Anthony DoerrAll the Light We Cannot SeeWINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure's reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum's most valuable and dangerous jewel. In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure's converge. Doerr's "stunning sense of physical detail and gorgeous metaphors" ( San Francisco Chronicle ) are dazzling. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, he illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another. Ten years in the writing, a National Book Award finalist, All the Light We Cannot See is a magnificent, deeply moving novel from a writer "whose sentences never fail to thrill" ( Los Angeles Times ). - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
LEISURE READING FICTION DOE
Publication Date:
2015




Visit from the Goon Squad, A
by Egan, Jennifer

9780307477477Jennifer EganA Visit from the Goon Squad NATIONAL BESTSELLER National Book Critics Circle Award Winner PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist A New York Times Book Review Best Book One of the Best Books of the Year: nbsp; Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, The Daily Beast, The Miami Herald, The Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Newsday, NPR's On Point, O, the Oprah Magazine, People, Publishers Weekly, Salon, San Francisco Chronicle, Seattle Times, Slate, Time, The Washington Post, and Village Voice Bennie is an aging former punk rocker and record executive.nbsp;Sasha isnbsp;the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Here Jennifer Egan brilliantly reveals their pasts, along with the inner lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs. With music pulsing on every page, A Visit from the Goon Squad is anbsp;startling, exhilarating novel of self-destruction and redemption. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
LEISURE FICTION EGA
Publication Date:
2011




Middlesex
by Eugenides, Jeffrey

9780312422158Jeffrey EugenidesMiddlesex"I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day of January 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of l974. . . My birth certificate lists my name as Calliope Helen Stephanides. My most recent driver's license...records my first name simply as Cal." So begins the breathtaking story of Calliope Stephanides and three generations of the Greek-American Stephanides family who travel from a tiny village overlooking Mount Olympus in Asia Minor to Prohibition-era Detroit, witnessing its glory days as the Motor City, and the race riots of l967, before they move out to the tree-lined streets of suburban Grosse Pointe, Michigan. To understand why Calliope is not like other girls, she has to uncover a guilty family secret and the astonishing genetic history that turns Callie into Cal, one of the most audacious and wondrous narrators in contemporary fiction. Lyrical and thrilling, Middlesex is an exhilarating reinvention of the American epic. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3555 .U4 M53 2002
Publication Date:
2003




Keepers of the House, The
by Grau, Shirley Ann

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3513 .R3 K4
Publication Date:
1965




Tinkers
by Harding, Paul

9781934137123Paul HardingTinkersPulitzer Prize Winner and New York Times Bestseller "There are few perfect debut American novels. . . . To this list ought to be added Paul Harding's devastating first book, Tinkers. . . . Harding has written a masterpiece." -- NPR "In Paul Harding's stunning first novel, we find what readers, writers and reviewers live for." -- San Francisco Chronicle " Tinkers is truly remarkable." -- Marilynne Robinson , Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Home, Gilead, and Housekeeping An old man lies dying. Propped up in his living room and surrounded by his children and grandchildren, George Washington Crosby drifts in and out of consciousness, back to the wonder and pain of his impoverished childhood in Maine. As the clock repairer's time winds down, his memories intertwine with those of his father, an epileptic, itinerant peddler and his grandfather, a Methodist preacher beset by madness. At once heartbreaking and life affirming, Tinkers is an elegiac meditation on love, loss, illness, faith, and the fierce beauty of nature. Paul Harding is the author of two novels about multiple generations of a New England family: the Pulitzer Prize-winning Tinkers and Enon. He has taught at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Harvard University, and Grinnell College. He now lives in Massachusetts with his wife and two sons. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3608 .A72535 2009
Publication Date:
2010







Orphan Master's Son, The
by Johnson, Adam

9780812992793Adam JohnsonThe Orphan Master's Son The Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times betselling novel of North Korea: an epic journey into the heart of the world's most mysterious dictatorship. "Imagine Charles Dickens paying a visit to Pyongyang, and you see the canvas on which [Adam] Johnson is painting here." --The Washington Post Pak Jun Do is the haunted son of a lost mother--a singer "stolen" to Pyongyang--and an influential father who runs a work camp for orphans. Superiors in the North Korean state soon recognize the boy's loyalty and keen instincts. Considering himself "a humble citizen of the greatest nation in the world," Jun Do rises in the ranks. He becomes a professional kidnapper who must navigate the shifting rules, arbitrary violence, and baffling demands of his overlords in order to stay alive. Driven to the absolute limit of what any human being could endure, he boldly takes on the treacherous role of rival to Kim Jong Il in an attempt to save the woman he loves, Sun Moon, a legendary actress "so pure, she didn't know what starving people looked like." Part breathless thriller, part story of innocence lost, part story of romantic love, The Orphan Master's Son is also a riveting portrait of a world heretofore hidden from view: a North Korea rife with hunger, corruption, and casual cruelty but also camaraderie, stolen moments of beauty, and love. FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD * WINNER OF THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE Named ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR by more than a dozen publications, including The Washington Post * Entertainment Weekly * The Wall Street Journal * Los Angeles Times * San Francisco Chronicle Praise for The Orphan Master ' s Son "An exquisitely crafted novel that carries the reader on an adventuresome journey into the depths of totalitarian North Korea and into the most intimate spaces of the human heart." --Pulitzer Prize citation "Mr. Johnson has written a daring and remarkable novel, a novel that not only opens a frightening window on the mysterious kingdom of North Korea, but one that also excavates the very meaning of love and sacrifice." --Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "Rich with a sense of discovery . . . The Orphan Master's Son has an early lead on novel of [the year]." --The Daily Beast "This is a novel worth getting excited about." -- The Washington Post "[A] ripping piece of fiction that is also an astute commentary on the nature of freedom, sacrifice, and glory." -- Elle - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
LEISURE FICTION JOH
Publication Date:
2013




Known World, The
by Jones, Edward P.

9780060557546Edward P. JonesThe Known WorldHenry Townsend, a black farmer, bootmaker, and former slave, has a fondness for Paradise Lost and an unusual mentor -- William Robbins, perhaps the most powerful man in antebellum Virginia's Manchester County. Under Robbins's tutelage, Henry becomes proprietor of his own plantation -- as well as of his own slaves. When he dies, his widow, Caldonia, succumbs to profound grief, and things begin to fall apart at their plantation: slaves take to escaping under the cover of night, and families who had once found love beneath the weight of slavery begin to betray one another. Beyond the Townsend estate, the known world also unravels: low-paid white patrollers stand watch as slave "speculators" sell free black people into slavery, and rumors of slave rebellions set white families against slaves who have served them for years. An ambitious, luminously written novel that ranges seamlessly between the past and future and back again to the present, The Known World weaves together the lives of freed and enslaved blacks, whites, and Indians -- and allows all of us a deeper understanding of the enduring multidimensional world created by the institution of slavery. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3560 .04813 K58 2003
Publication Date:
2004







Interpreter of Maladies
by Lahiri, Jhumpa

9780618101368046442101363Jhumpa LahiriInterpreter of MaladiesNavigating between the Indian traditions they've inherited and the baffling new world, the characters in Jhumpa Lahiri's elegant, touching stories seek love beyond the barriers of culture and generations. In "A Temporary Matter," published in The New Yorker, a young Indian-American couple faces the heartbreak of a stillborn birth while their Boston neighborhood copes with a nightly blackout. In the title story, an interpreter guides an American family through the India of their ancestors and hears an astonishing confession. Lahiri writes with deft cultural insight reminiscent of Anita Desai and a nuanced depth that recalls Mavis Gallant. She is an important and powerful new voice. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3562 .A316 I58 1999
Publication Date:
2000




Foreign Affairs
by Lurie, Alison

9780394540764Alison LurieForeign AffairsWINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE Virginia Miner, a fifty-something, unmarried tenured professor, is in London to work on her new book about children's folk rhymes. Despite carrying a U.S. passport, Vinnie feels essentially English and rather looks down on her fellow Americans. But in spite of that, she is drawn into a mortifying and oddly satisfying affair with an Oklahoman tourist who dresses more Bronco Billy than Beau Brummel. Also in London is Vinnie's colleague Fred Turner, a handsome, flat broke, newly separated, and thoroughly miserable young man trying to focus on his own research. Instead, he is distracted by a beautiful and unpredictable English actress and the world she belongs to. Both American, both abroad, and both achingly lonely, Vinnie and Fred play out their confused alienation and dizzying romantic liaisons in Alison Lurie's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Smartly written, poignant, and witty, Foreign Affairs remains an enduring comic masterpiece. A splendid comedy, very bright, brilliantly written in a confident and original manner. The best book by one of our finest writers. -Elizabeth Hardwick There is no American writer I have read with more constant pleasure and sympathy. . . . Foreign Affairs earns the same shelf as Henry James and Edith Wharton.-John Fowles If you manage to read only a few good novels a year, make this one of them.-USA Today An ingenious, touching book.-Newsweek A flawless jewel.-Philadelphia Inquirer From the Trade Paperback edition. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3562 . U7 F6 1984
Publication Date:
1985




Executioner's Song, The
by Mailer, Norman

9780316544177Norman MailerThe Executioner's SongThe Executioner's Song, Norman Mailer's brilliant, Pulitzer Prize-winning story of the crimes and punishment of a 20th-century murderer and thief, is what the author calls a "true-life novel." It is a horrifying, sad, scrupulously detailed look at the events leading up to the moment Gary Gilmore was killed by a firing squad in Utah State Prison on January 17, 1977. Based on interviews, records of court proceedings, newspaper stories, and various other documents, it covers the nine months between Gilmore's parole from prison, his final crime, and his execution. The blurring of the distinction between fiction and nonfiction was one of the central developments of postwar American literature, and Mailer's imaginative use of the facts is an extension of his earlier forays into the "new journalism." He re-creates Gillmore's tormented psyche, recounts his crimes, takes in the story of Mormonism and the history of Utah, introduces Uncle Vern, Aunt Ida, victims, cops, cons, guards, lovers, and lawyers. The "Western Voices" of small-town America and the "Eastern Voices" of the journalists and show-biz types who descend on the Gilmore story are fused into a remarkable chorus, amplifying the presence of Gilmore himself, a smart, funny, doomed man - one of the most complex characters in modern letters. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3525 .A4152 E895
Publication Date:
1980




Fixer, The
by Malamud, Bernard

9781598532937Bernard Malamud; Philip Davis (Editor)Malamud - Novels and Stories of the 1960s: A New Life; the Fixer - Pictures of Fidelman - An Exhibition, Stories'Read now,' Philip Roth has observed, 'you see that Bernard Malamud has more than a little in common with Beckett - the eerie clowning, the magic barrel of unadorned prose, the haunting melancholy of stories about 'things you can't get past.' For me, as a young writer of the next generation starting out in the 1950s - and trying to lay claim to my own Jewish material - his fiction, along with Saul Bellow's, meant the world,' With this volume and its companion, Novels and Stories of the 1940s & 50's , The Library of America initiates a three-volume edition celebrating the distinctive genius of one of postwar America's most important and original writers. In 1949, Bernard Malamud accepted a teaching position at Oregon State University and moved from his native New York City to the Pacific Northwest. His experience over the following decade deeply informed the writing of A New Life (1961), a satiric campus novel that takes aim at the insularity, back-biting, and intellectual pettiness of academia. At its center is Seymour Levin, a naive idealist whose initiation into the ivory tower leads to his entanglement in a departmental power struggle and an emotionally wrenching affair with a colleague's wife. By turns comic and lyrical, A New Life 'may still be under-valued,' writes Jonathan Lethem, 'as Malamud's funniest and most embracing novel.' The Fixer (1966) marked a turn for Malamud into the realm of historical fiction. Set during the twilight years of czarist Russia, the novel tells the story of Yakov Bok, a Jewish handyman who leaves his village to find work in Kiev, only to be arrested and charged with the murder of a twelve-year-old boy, purportedly for use in a Jewish ritual. A dramatization of the infamous blood-libel accusations unleashed against Jews over centuries of European history, Malamud's novel is also an exploration of one man's transformation under the extreme duress of imprisonment. Malmud won his second National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for The Fixer in 1967. The picaresque novel Pictures of Fidelman- An Exhibition (1969) is one of Malamud's most exuberant creations- a series of tales about a self-described failed artist adrift in Italy. More freewheeling than much of Malamud's other fiction, the collection shows a playfulness and willingness to experiment that accords with the restlessness and curiosity of its hero. The ten stories from the 1960s gathered in this volume show Malamud at the height of his powers as a storyteller. Among them are the hallucinatory comedy of 'The Jewbird' and the pathos of 'The German Refugee' and the long story 'Man in the Drawer.' As the novelist Robert Stone has said of the stories 'Like Chekhov's, they are edifying in their tragic sense and delightful in their comedy, which seems to be the most we can ask of fiction.' Philip Davis, editor, is the author of the definitive biography Bernard Malamud- A Writer's Life (2007). He is the editor of The Reader magazine and Professor of English Literature and Director of the Centre for Research into Reading, Information and Linguistic Systems at the University of Liverpool. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3563 .A4 F5
Publication Date:
1967




Road, The
by McCarthy, Cormac

9780307387899Cormac MccarthyThe RoadNATIONAL BESTSELLER PULITZER PRIZE WINNER National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist A New York Times Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year The Boston Globe, The Christian Science Monitor, The Denver Post, The Kansas City Star, Los Angeles Times, New York, People, Rocky Mountain News, Time, The Village Voice, The Washington Post The searing, postapocalyptic novel destined to become Cormac McCarthy's masterpiece. A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food--and each other. The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, "each the other's world entire," are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3563 .C37 R63 2006
Publication Date:
2007










Beloved
by Morrison, Toni

9780394535975Toni MorrisonBelovedToni Morrison--author of Song of Solomon and Tar Baby --is a writer of remarkable powers: her novels, brilliantly acclaimed for their passion, their dazzling language and their lyric and emotional force, combine the unassailable truths of experience and emotion with the vision of legend and imagination. It is the story--set in post-Civil War Ohio--of Sethe, an escaped slave who has risked death in order to wrench herself from a living death; who has lost a husband and buried a child; who has borne the unthinkable and not gone mad: a woman of "iron eyes and backbone to match." Sethe lives in a small house on the edge of town with her daughter, Denver, her mother-in-law, Baby Suggs, and a disturbing, mesmerizing intruder who calls herself Beloved. Sethe works at "beating back the past," but it is alive in all of them. It keeps Denver fearful of straying from the house. It fuels the sadness that has settled into Baby Suggs' "desolated center where the self that was no self made its home." And to Sethe, the past makes itself heard and felt incessantly: in memories that both haunt and soothe her...in the arrival of Paul D ("There was something blessed in his manner. Women saw him and wanted to weep"), one of her fellow slaves on the farm where she had once been kept...in the vivid and painfully cathartic stories she and Paul D tell each other of their years in captivity, of their glimpses of freedom...and, most powerfully, in the apparition of Beloved, whose eyes are expressionless at their deepest point, whose doomed childhood belongs to the hideous logic of slavery and who, as daughter, sister and seductress, has now come from the "place over there" to claim retribution for what she lost and for what was taken from her. Sethe's struggle to keep Beloved from gaining full possession of her present--and to throw off the long, dark legacy of her past--is at the center of this profoundly affecting and startling novel. But its intensity and resonance of feeling, and the boldness of its narrative, lift it beyond its particulars so that it speaks to our experience as an entire nation with a past of both abominable and ennobling circumstance. In Beloved, Toni Morrison has given us a great American novel. Toni Morrison was awarded the 1988 Pulitzer Prize in Literature for Beloved. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3563 .O8749 B4 1987
Publication Date:
1988




Collected Stories
by Porter, Katherine Anne

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3531 .O752 C6
Publication Date:
1966




Shipping News, The
by Proulx, E. Annie

9780671510053Annie Proulx (Adapted by)The Shipping NewsWinner of the Pulitzer Prize, Annie Proulx's The Shipping News is a vigorous, darkly comic, and at times magical portrait of the contemporary North American family. Quoyle, a third-rate newspaper hack, with a "head shaped like a crenshaw, no neck, reddish hair...features as bunched as kissed fingertips," is wrenched violently out of his workaday life when his two-timing wife meets her just desserts. An aunt convinces Quoyle and his two emotionally disturbed daughters to return with her to the starkly beautiful coastal landscape of their ancestral home in Newfoundland. Here, on desolate Quoyle's Point, in a house empty except for a few mementos of the family's unsavory past, the battered members of three generations try to cobble up new lives. Newfoundland is a country of coast and cove where the mercury rarely rises above seventy degrees, the local culinary delicacy is cod cheeks, and it's easier to travel by boat and snowmobile than on anything with wheels. In this harsh place of cruel storms, a collapsing fishery, and chronic unemployment, the aunt sets up as a yacht upholsterer in nearby Killick-Claw, and Quoyle finds a job reporting the shipping news for the local weekly, the Gammy Bird (a paper that specializes in sexual-abuse stories and grisly photos of car accidents). As the long winter closes its jaws of ice, each of the Quoyles confronts private demons, reels from catastrophe to minor triumph--in the company of the obsequious Mavis Bangs; Diddy Shovel the strongman; drowned Herald Prowse; cane-twirling Beety; Nutbeem, who steals foreign news from the radio; a demented cousin the aunt refuses to recognize; the much-zippered Alvin Yark; silent Wavey; and old Billy Pretty, with his bag of secrets. By the time of the spring storms Quoyle has learned how to gut cod, to escape from a pickle jar, and to tie a true lover's knot. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS35666 .R697 S4 1994
Publication Date:
1994







American Pastoral
by Roth, Philip

9780375701429Philip RothAmerican PastoralWinner of the Pulitzer Prize Now a major motion picture starring Ewan McGregor, Jennifer Connelly, and Dakota Fanning Here is Philip Roth's masterpiece--an elegy for the American century's promises of prosperity, civic order, and domestic bliss. Roth's protagonist is Swede Levov, a legendary athlete at his Newark high school, who grows up in the booming postwar years to marry a former Miss New Jersey, inherit his father's glove factory, and move into a stone house in the idyllic hamlet of Old Rimrock. And then one day in 1968, Swede's beautiful American luck deserts him. For Swede's adored daughter, Merry, has grown from a loving, quick-witted girl into a sullen, fanatical teenager--a teenager capable of an outlandishly savage act of political terrorism. And overnight Swede is wrenched out of the longed-for American pastoral and into the indigenous American berserk. Compulsively readable, propelled by sorrow, rage, and a deep compassion for its characters, American Pastoral gives us Philip Roth at the height of his powers. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3568 .O855 A77 1998
Publication Date:
1998




Thousand Acres, A
by Smiley, Jane

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3569 .M39 T47 1992
Publication Date:
1992




Collected Stories
by Stafford, Jean

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3569 .T2 A6 1969
Publication Date:
1970




Angle of Repose
by Stegner, Wallace

Link to record for more information.

Call Number:
PS3537 .T316 A8
Publication Date:
1972




Confessions of Nat Turner, The
by Styron, William

9780679736639William StyronThe Confessions of Nat TurnerThe story that inspired the major motion picture The Birth of a Nation (2016) In the late summer of 1831, in a remote section of southeastern Virginia, there took place the only effective, sustained revolt in the annals of American Negro slavery... The revolt was led by a remarkable Negro preacher named Nat Turner, an educated slave who felt himself divinely ordained to annihilate all the white people in the region. The Confessions of Nat Turner is narrated by Nat himself as he lingers in jail through the cold autumnal days before his execution. The compelling story ranges over the whole of Nat's Life, reaching its inevitable and shattering climax that bloody day in August. The Confessions of Nat Turner is not only a masterpiece of storytelling; is also reveals in unforgettable human terms the agonizing essence of Negro slavery. Through the mind of a slave, Willie Styron has re-created a catastrophic event, and dramatized the intermingled miseries, frustrations--and hopes--which caused this extraordinary black man to rise up out of the early mists of our history and strike down those who held his people in bondage. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3569 .T9 C6
Publication Date:
1968




Goldfinch, The
by Tartt, Donna

9780316055437Donna TarttThe GoldfinchWINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE " The Goldfinch is a rarity that comes along perhaps half a dozen times per decade, a smartly written literary novel that connects with the heart as well as the mind....Donna Tartt has delivered an extraordinary work of fiction."--Stephen King, The New York Times Book Review Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his longing for his mother, he clings to the one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art. As an adult, Theo moves silkily between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty labyrinth of an antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love--and at the center of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle. The Goldfinch is a mesmerizing, stay-up-all-night and tell-all-your-friends triumph, an old-fashioned story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the ruthless machinations of fate. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
LEISURE FICTION TAR
Publication Date:
2014




Summons to Memphis, A
by Taylor, Peter

9780394410623Peter TaylorA Summons to MemphisOne of the most celebrated novels of its time, the Pulitzer Prize winner A Summons to Memphis introduces the Carver family, natives of Nashville, residents, with the exception of Phillip, of Memphis, Tennessee. During the twilight of a Sunday afternoon in March, New York book editor Phillip Carver receives an urgent phone call from each of his older, unmarried sisters. They plead with Phillip to help avert their widower father's impending remarriage to a younger woman. Hesitant to get embroiled in a family drama, he reluctantly agrees to go back south, only to discover the true motivation behing his sisters' concern. While there, Phillip is forced to confront his domineering siblings, a controlling patriarch, and flood of memories from this troubled past. Peter Taylor is one of the masters of Southern literature, whose work stands in the company of Eudora Walty, James Agee, and Walker Percy. In A Summons to Memphis, he composed a richly evocative story of revenge, resolution, and redemption, and gave us a classic work of American literature. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3539 .A9633 S8 1986
Publication Date:
1987







Breathing Lessons
by Tyler, Anne

9780394572345Anne TylerBreathing LessonsMaggie and Ira Moran have been married for twenty-eight years¿and it shows: in their quarrels, in their routines, in their ability to tolerate with affection each other¿s eccentricities. Maggie, a kooky, lovable meddler and an irrepressible optimist, wants nothing more than to fix her son¿s broken marriage. Ira is infuriatingly practical, a man ¿who should have married Ann Landers.¿ And what begins as a day trip to a funeral becomes an adventure in the unexpected. As Maggie and Ira navigate the riotous twists and turns, they intersect with an assorted cast of eccentrics¿and rediscover the magic of the road called life and the joy of having somebody next to you to share the ride . . . bumps and all. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3570 .Y45 B74 1988
Publication Date:
1989




Rabbit at Rest
by Updike, John

9780394588155John UpdikeRabbit at RestIn John Updike's fourth and final novel about ex-basketball player Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, the hero has acquired heart trouble, a Florida condo, and a second grandchild. His son, Nelson, is behaving erratically; his daughter-in-law, Pru, is sending out mixed signals; and his wife, Janice, decides in midlife to become a working girl. As, through the winter, spring, and summer of 1989, Reagan's debt-ridden, AIDS-plagued America yields to that of George Bush, Rabbit explores the bleak terrain of late middle age, looking for reasons to live. The geographical locale is divided between Brewer, in southestern Pennyslvania, and Deleon, in southwestern Florida. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3571 .P4 R23 1990
Publication Date:
1991




Rabbit Is Rich
by Updike, John

9780394520872John UpdikeRabbit Is RichThe hero of John Updike's Rabbit, Run (1960), ten years after the hectic events described in Rabbit Redux (1971), has come to enjoy considerable prosperity as Chief Sales Representative of Springer Motors, a Toyota agency in Brewer, Pennsylvania. The time is 1979: Skylab is falling, gas lines are lengthening, the President collapses while running in a marathon, and double-digit inflation coincides with a deflation of national confidence. Nevertheless, Harry Angstrom feels in good shape, ready to enjoy life at last -- until his son, Nelson, returns from the West, and the image of an old love pays a visit to his lot. New characters and old populate these scenes from Rabbit's middle age, as he continues to pursue, in his erratic fashion, the rainbow of happiness. - Description from Syndetics
Call Number:
PS3571 .P4 R25 1981
Publication Date:
1982















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