Skip to Content

GCC Logo

Featured Books

Expand List: Display All Titles on List, including non-GCC titles
Sort By: Rank | Author | Title | Year | Call Number |



Women's History

(Librarian Selected)



America's Women: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines
by Collins, Gail

9780060185107Gail CollinsAmerica's Women: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and HeroinesAmerica's Women tells the story of more than four centuries of history. It features a stunning array of personalities, from the women peering worriedly over the side of the Mayflower to feminists having a grand old time protesting beauty pageants and bridal fairs. Courageous, silly, funny, and heartbreaking, these women shaped the nation and our vision of what it means to be female in America. By culling the most fascinating characters -- the average as well as the celebrated -- Gail Collins, the editorial page editor at the New York Times, charts a journey that shows how women lived, what they cared about, and how they felt about marriage, sex, and work. She begins with the lost colony of Roanoke and the early southern "tobacco brides" who came looking for a husband and sometimes -- thanks to the stupendously high mortality rate -- wound up marrying their way through three or four. Spanning wars, the pioneering days, the fight for suffrage, the Depression, the era of Rosie the Riveter, the civil rights movement, and the feminist rebellion of the 1970s, America's Women describes the way women's lives were altered by dress fashions, medical advances, rules of hygiene, social theories about sex and courtship, and the ever-changing attitudes toward education, work, and politics. While keeping her eye on the big picture, Collins still notes that corsets and uncomfortable shoes mattered a lot, too. "The history of American women is about the fight for freedom," Collins writes in her introduction, "but it's less a war against oppressive men than a struggle to straighten out the perpetually mixed message about women's roles that was accepted by almost everybody of both genders." Told chronologically through the compelling stories of individual lives that, linked together, provide a complete picture of the American woman's experience, America's Women is both a great read and a landmark work of history. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




American Women Activists' Writings: An Anthology
by Cullen-DuPont, Kathryn

9780815411857Kathryn Cullen-DuPontAmerican Women Activists' Writings: An Anthology, 1637-2001America's women activists have striven bravely and tirelessly to affect the course of American history. Their story, as told in letters, memoirs, diaries, and speeches, is as wide and varied as America itself. This anthology begins with the then-government's attempt to silence Anne Hutchinson, not permitted to address mixed audiences of men and women in the Massachusetts Bay colony, and leads to the formation of the women's rights movement. Highlights include Sojourner Truth describing her escape from slavery; Alice Walker's assessment of her work to end female genital mutilation; and Margarethe Cammermeyer's attempt to end the military's discharge of homosexuals. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Women Nobel Peace Prize Winners
by Davis, Anita Price; Selvidge, Marla J

9780786423996Anita Price Davis; Marla J. Selvidge; Regina Birchem (Foreword by)Women Nobel Peace Prize WinnersTo benefit humanity - an ironic epitaph for the man who patented dynamite, yet none fits him better. A reclusive and somewhat eccentric millionaire, Alfred Nobel was nevertheless known for his willingness to help others. A recipient of the Letterstedt Prize for his contributions to scientific knowledge, Nobel wanted late in life to endow a similar series of prizes. So he willed his 10 million dollar estate and the interest from all his investments to the establishment of five annual Nobel Prizes, the most prestigious awarded for contributions to a lasting peace. From Bertha von Suttner (1905) to Wangari Maathai (2004), this work provides a detailed look at the lives and accomplishments of 12 female recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize, with emphasis on the work that earned them the Nobel. Hailing from various nations and walks of life, the winners include Jane Addams, Mother Teresa, Alva Reimer Myrdal, Jody Williams and Shirin Ebadi. An appendix contains the complete list of Nobel Peace Prize winners from 1901 to 2004. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




A History of Women in the West
by Duby, Georges; Perrot, Michelle; Schmitt Pantel, Pauline

9780674403734Georges Duby (Contribution by); Michelle Perrot (Contribution by); Arthur Goldhammer (Translator); Geneviève Fraisse (Editor)Emerging Feminism from Revolution to World WarThe French Revolution opened a whole new stage in the history of women, despite their conspicuous absence from the playbill. The coming century would see women's subordination to men codified in all manner of new laws and rules; and yet the period would also witness the birth of feminism, the unprecedented emergence of women as a collective force in the political arena. The fourth volume in this world-acclaimed series covers the distance between these two poles, between the French Revolution and World War I. It gives us a vibrant picture of a bourgeois century, dynamic and expansive, in which the role of woman in the home was stressed more and more, even as the economic pressures and opportunities of the industrial revolution drew her out of the house; in which woman's growing role in the family as the center of all morals and virtues pressed her into public service to fight social ills. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Daughters of the Declaration
by Gaudiani, Claire; Burnett, D. Graham

9781610390316Claire Gaudiani; David Graham BurnettDaughters of the Declaration: How Women Social Entrepreneurs Built the American DreamAmerica's founding fathers established an idealistic framework for a bold experiment in democratic governance. The new nation would be built on the belief that "all men are created equal, and are endowed...with a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." The challenge of turning these ideals into reality for all citizens was taken up by a set of exceptional American women. Distinguished scholar and civic leader Claire Gaudiani calls these women "social entrepreneurs," arguing that they brought the same drive and strategic intent to their pursuit of "the greater good" that their male counterparts applied to building the nation's capital markets throughout the nineteenth century. Gaudiani tells the stories of these patriotic women, and their creation of America's unique not-for-profit, or "social profit" sector. She concludes that the idealism and optimism inherent in this work provided an important asset to the increasing prosperity of the nation from its founding to the Second World War. Social entrepreneurs have defined a system of governance "by the people," and they remain our best hope for continued moral leadership in the world. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Women in Science: Then and Now
by Gornick, Vivian

9781558615946Vivian GornickWomen in Science: Then and Now"Strongly felt, vigorously written."-The Women's Review of Books "Gornick's portraits demonstrate the driving force behind science."-The Philadelphia Inquirer "Opens the discussion about women's diverse problems and ambitions in science."-The New York Times Book Review "Women in science stir the contemporary imagination. In their hyphenated identity is captured the pain and excitement of a culture struggling to mature."-The Washington Post In this newly revised twenty-fifth anniversary edition, acclaimed writer and journalist Vivian Gornick interviews famous and lesser-known scientists, compares their experiences then and now, and shows that, although not much has changed in the world of science, what is different is women's expectations that they can and will succeed. Everything from the disparaging comments by Harvard's then-president to government reports and media coverage has focused on the ways in which women supposedly can't do science. Gornick's original interviews show how deep and severe discrimination against women was back then in all scientific fields. Her new interviews, with some of the same women she spoke to twenty-five years ago, provide a fresh description of the hard times and great successes these women have experienced. Vivian Gornick is the author of nine books and has been nominated for the National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award. Her articles have appeared in The Village Voice (where she was a staff writer for eight years), The Nation, The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and The New Yorker. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Women Making America
by Hemming, Heidi; Savage, Julie Hemming

9780982127117Heidi Hemming; Julie Hemming SavageWomen Making AmericaU.S. women's history for everyone! Explore the history you never learned in school. Experience the everyday struggles, delights, and courage of America's women from the Revolutionary War to the present in a format that all readers can enjoy. Dabble in history at a glance, or immerse yourself in comprehensive study. Read it for pleasure, or use it in the classroom. Historian Sally Roesch Wagner says, This is the book I've been waiting for. Full of rich and well-researched detail, it is a breathtaking swoop of everything from popular culture to suffrage, distilling complex material down to easy to understand information, and full of engagingly good anecdotes. The feel and taste and smell of the time come alive and the attention to accuracy is exemplary. Most importantly, it is not the typical narrow-focused history of white women of means, but the multifaceted story of the diversity of histories that speaks to all women of the United States. A joy to read! - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability







A Few Good Women: America's Military Women
by Monahan, Evelyn; Neidel-Greenlee, Rosemary

9781400095605Evelyn Monahan; Rosemary Neidel-GreenleeA Few Good Women: America's Military Women from World War I to the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan nbsp; In this riveting narrative history, women veterans from the world wars, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Afghanistan, and Iraq tell their extraordinary stories. Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee spent fifteen years combing through archives, journals, histories, and news reports, and gathering thousands of eyewitness accounts, letters, and interviews for this unprecedented chronicle of America's "few good women." Women today make up more than fifteen percent of the U.S. armed forces and serve alongside men in almost every capacity. Here are the stories of the battles these women fought to march beside their brothers, their tales of courage and fortitude, of indignities endured, of injustices overcome, of the blood they've shed and the comrades they've lost, and the challenges they still face in the twenty-first century. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Rebels at the Bar: America's First Women Lawyers
by Norgren, Jill

9780814758625Jill NorgrenRebels at the Bar: The Fascinating, Forgotten Stories of America's First Women LawyersLong before Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsberg earned their positions on the Supreme Court, they were preceded in their goal of legal excellence by several intrepid trailblazers. In Rebels at the Bar, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts the life stories of a small group of nineteenth century women who were among the first female attorneys in the United States. Beginning in the late 1860s, these determined rebels pursued the radical ambition of entering the then all-male profession of law. They were motivated by a love of learning. They believed in fair play and equal opportunity. They desired recognition as professionals and the ability to earn a good living. Through a biographical approach, Norgren presents the common struggles of eight women first to train and to qualify as attorneys, then to practice their hard-won professional privilege. Their story is one of nerve, frustration, and courage. This first generation practiced civil and criminal law, solo and in partnership. The women wrote extensively and lobbied on the major issues of the day, but the professional opportunities open to them had limits. They never had the opportunity to wear the black robes of a judge. They were refused entry into the lucrative practices of corporate and railroad law. Although male lawyers filled legislatures and the Foreign Service, presidents refused to appoint these early women lawyers to diplomatic offices and the public refused to elect them to legislatures. Rebels at the Bar expands our understanding of both women's rights and the history of the legal profession in the nineteenth century. It focuses on the female renegades who trained in law and then, like men, fought considerable odds to create successful professional lives. In this engaging and beautifully written book, Norgren shares her subjects' faith in the art of the possible. In so doing, she ensures their place in history. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability




Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History
by Ulrich, Laurel

9781400041596Laurel Thatcher UlrichWell-Behaved Women Seldom Make History"They didn't ask to be remembered," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Laurel Ulrich wrote in 1976 about the pious women of colonial New England. And then she added a phrase that has since gained widespread currency: "Well-behaved women seldom make history." Today those words appear almost everywhere--on T-shirts, mugs, bumper stickers, plaques, greeting cards, and more. But what do they really mean? In this engrossing volume, Laurel Ulrich goes far beyond the slogan she inadvertently created and explores what it means to make history.Her volume ranges over centuries and cultures, from the fifteenth-century writer Christine de Pizan, who imagined a world in which women achieved power and influence, to the writings of nineteenth-century suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton and twentieth-century novelist Virginia Woolf. Ulrich updates de Pizan's Amazons with stories about women warriors from other times and places. She contrasts Woolf's imagined story about Shakespeare's sister with biographies of actual women who were Shakespeare's contemporaries. She turns Stanton's encounter with a runaway slave upside down, asking how the story would change if the slave rather than the white suffragist were at the center. She uses daybook illustrations to look at women who weren't trying to make history, but did. Throughout, she shows how the feminist wave of the 1970s created a generation of historians who by challenging traditional accounts of both men's and women's histories stimulated more vibrant and better-documented accounts of the past. Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History celebrates a renaissance in history inspired by amateurs, activists, and professional historians. It is a tribute to history and to those who make it. - Description from Syndetics
Location/Availability









Award Lists

Featured Books

See Also


Building: Library Media Center (LMC)
Circulation: (623) 845-3109
Reference: (623) 845-3112

Site Index:  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

   

Building: (GCN B) "Beshbito"
Circulation: (623) 888-7109
Reference: (623) 888-7112

My Maricopa Link Glendale Community College - 6000 West Olive Avenue - Glendale Arizona 85302 - (623) 845-3000
Glendale Community College - North Campus - 5727 West Happy Valley Road - Phoenix Arizona 85310 - (623) 845-4000
Legal Disclaimer | Accreditation | Policies & Disclosures
Page maintained by Library Web Group
Maricopa County Community College District


Modified: January 24, 2017