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Politics

Featured Books on Mexican Politics

 

Politics in Mexico: the democratic consolidation
by Camp, Roderic Ai

9780195313321Roderic Ai CampPolitics in Mexico: The Democratic ConsolidationThoroughly grounded in Mexican history and based on extensive field research, this introduction examines the roots of Mexico's contemporary political culture and its democratic transformation. Now in its fifth edition, Politics in Mexico has been completely updated and revised to cover the2006 presidential elections. Featuring data from four recent major research projects, the book discusses the historical background and evolution of voter behavior responsible for sweeping Mr. Fox into office in 2000 and electing his successor in 2006. It analyzes the increasingly important role ofCongress, and the relationship between Mexico and the United States. This edition features new data and tables based on original survey research that strengthens existing coverage of women, religion and politics, decision-making, political participation, citizen socialization, voter behavior,federalism, and electoral politics. Engagingly written by one of the top scholars in the field, Politics in Mexico is essential reading for students of Mexican or Latin American politics, comparative politics, and Mexican history. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC Library - GENERAL - JL1281 .C35 2007
Politics in Mexico: the democratic consolidation Book Cover




Mexico: democracy interrupted
by Tuckman, Jo

9780300160314Jo TuckmanMexico: Democracy InterruptedIn 2000, Mexico's long invincible Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) lost the presidential election to Vicente Fox of the National Action Party (PAN). The ensuing changeover--after 71 years of PRI dominance--was hailed as the beginning of a new era of hope for Mexico. Yet the promises of the PAN victory were not consolidated. In this vivid account of Mexico's recent history, a journalist with extensive reporting experience investigates the nation's young democracy, its shortcomings and achievements, and why the PRI is favored to retake the presidency in 2012. Jo Tuckman reports on the murky, terrifying world of Mexico's drug wars, the counterproductive government strategy, and the impact of U.S. policies. She describes the reluctance and inability of politicians to seriously tackle rampant corruption, environmental degradation, pervasive poverty, and acute inequality. To make matters worse, the influence of non-elected interest groups has grown and public trust in almost all institutions--including the Catholic church--is fading. The pressure valve once presented by emigration is also closing. Even so, there are positive signs: the critical media cannot be easily controlled, and small but determined citizen groups notch up significant, if partial, victories for accountability. While Mexico faces complex challenges that can often seem insurmountable, Tuckman concludes, the unflagging vitality and imagination of many in Mexico inspire hope for a better future. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC Library - GENERAL - F1236.7 .T83 2012
Mexico: democracy interrupted Book Cover




Singing for the dead: the politics of indigenous revival in Mexico
by Faudree, Paja

9780822354314Paja FaudreeSinging for the Dead: The Politics of Indigenous Revival in MexicoSinging for the Dead chronicles ethnic revival in Oaxaca, Mexico, where new forms of singing and writing in the local Mazatec indigenous language are producing powerful, transformative political effects. Paja Faudree argues for the inclusion of singing as a necessary component in the polarized debates about indigenous orality and literacy, and she considers how the coupling of literacy and song has allowed people from the region to create texts of enduring social resonance. She examines how local young people are learning to read and write in Mazatec as a result of the region's new Day of the Dead song contest. Faudree also studies how tourist interest in local psychedelic mushrooms has led to their commodification, producing both opportunities and challenges for songwriters and others who represent Mazatec culture. She situates these revival movements within the contexts of Mexico and Latin America, as well as the broad, hemisphere-wide movement to create indigenous literatures. Singing for the Dead provides a new way to think about the politics of ethnicity, the success of social movements, and the limits of national belonging. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC Library - GENERAL - F1221 .M35 F38 2013
Singing for the dead: the politics of indigenous revival in Mexico Book Cover







Revolution and state in modern Mexico
by Morton, Adam David

9780742554900Adam David MortonRevolution and State in Modern Mexico: The Political Economy of Uneven DevelopmentNow in an updated edition, this groundbreaking study develops a new approach to understanding the formation of the postrevolutionary state in Mexico. In a shift away from dominant interpretations, Adam David Morton considers the construction of the revolution and the modern Mexican state through a fresh analysis of the Mexican Revolution, the era of import substitution industrialization, and neoliberalism. Throughout, the author makes interdisciplinary links among geography, political economy, postcolonialism, and Latin American studies in order to provide a new framework for analyzing the development of state power in Mexico. He also explores key processes in the contestation of the modern state, specifically through studies of the role of intellectuals, democratization and democratic transition, and spaces of resistance. As Morton argues, all these themes can only be fully understood through the lens of uneven development in Latin America. Centrally, the book shows how the history of modern state formation and uneven development in Mexico is best understood as a form of passive revolution, referring to the ongoing class strategies that have shaped relations between state and civil society. As such, Morton makes an important interdisciplinary contribution to debates on state formation relevant to Mexican studies, postcolonial and development studies, historical sociology, and international political economy by revitalizing the debate on the uneven and combined character of development in Mexico and throughout Latin America. In so doing, he convincingly contends that uneven development can once again become a tool for radical political economy analysis in and beyond the region. A substantive new epilogue engages the main theoretical debates that have emerged since the book was first published, while also exploring the dominant geographies of power and resistance that are shaping state space in Mexico in the twenty-first century. And now a Spanish edition, Revolucion y Estado en Mexico moderno (Mexico, D.F.: Siglo XXI, 2017), is available as well. Click here to see the book trailer. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC North Library - GENERAL - HC135 .M74 2013
Revolution and state in modern Mexico Book Cover




Mexico: narco-violence and a failed state?
by Grayson, George W

9781412811514George W. GraysonMexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?* Mexico was named an Outstanding Academic Title of 2010 by Choice Magazine. Bloodshed connected with Mexican drug cartels, how they emerged, and their impact on the United States is the subject of this frightening book. Savage narcotics-related decapitations, castrations, and other murders have destroyed tourism in many Mexican communities and such savagery is now cascading across the border into the United States. Grayson explores how this spiral of violence emerged in Mexico, its impact on the country and its northern neighbor, and the prospects for managing it. Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ruled in Tammany Hall fashion for seventy-nine years before losing the presidency in 2000 to the center-right National Action Party (PAN). Grayson focuses on drug wars, prohibition, corruption, and other antecedents that occurred during the PRI's hegemony. He illuminates the diaspora of drug cartels and their fragmentation, analyzes the emergence of new gangs, sets forth President Felipe Calder�n's strategy against vicious criminal organizations, and assesses its relative success. Grayson reviews the effect of narcotics-focused issues in U.S.-Mexican relations. He considers the possibility that Mexico may become a failed state, as feared by opinion-leaders, even as it pursues an aggressive but thus far unsuccessful crusade against the importation, processing, and sale of illegal substances. Becoming a "failed state" involves two dimensions of state power: its scope, or the different functions and goals taken on by governments, and its strength, or the government's ability to plan and execute policies. The Mexican state boasts an extensive scope evidenced by its monopoly over the petroleum industry, its role as the major supplier of electricity, its financing of public education, its numerous retirement and health-care programs, its control of public universities, and its dominance over the armed forces. The state has not yet taken control of drug trafficking, and its strength is steadily diminishing. This explosive book is thus a study of drug cartels, but also state disintegration. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC Library - GENERAL - HV5840 .M4 G73 2010
Mexico: narco-violence and a failed state? Book Cover




Mexico: what everyone needs to know
by Camp, Roderic A

9780199773886Roderic Ai CampMexicoToday all would agree that Mexico and the United States have never been closer - that the fates of the two republics are inextricably intertwined. It has become an intimate part of life in almost every community in the United States, through immigration, imported produce, business ties, orillegal drugs. It is less a neighbor than a sibling; no matter what our differences, it is intricately a part of our existence. In this outstanding contribution to Oxford's acclaimed series, What Everyone Needs to Know, Roderic Ai Camp gives readers the most essential information about our sister republic to the south. Camp organizes chapters around major themes - security and violence, economic development, foreignrelations, the colonial heritage, and more. He asks questions that take us beyond the headlines: Why does Mexico have so much drug violence? What was the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement? How democratic is Mexico? Who were Benito Juarez and Pancho Villa? What is the PRI (theInstitutional Revolutionary Party)? The answers are sometimes surprising. Despite ratification of NAFTA, for example, Mexico has fallen behind Brazil and Chile in economic growth and rates of poverty. Camp explains that lack of labor flexibility, along with low levels of transparency and high levelsof corruption, make Mexico less competitive than some other Latin American countries. The drug trade, of course, enhances corruption and feeds on poverty; approximately 450,000 Mexicans now work in this sector. But Camp reveals that President Calderon's recent assault on narcotics smugglers - andthe violence resulting from it - may have actually lessened the government's control of parts of the country and national institutions. Brisk, clear, and informed, Mexico: What Everyone Needs To Know offers a valuable primer for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of our neighbor to the South. - Description from Syndetics
Glendale CC Library - GENERAL - JL1281 .C339 2011
Glendale CC North Library - GENERAL - JL1281 .C339 2011
Mexico: what everyone needs to know Book Cover





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